On Sunday evening, August 1, a group of 10 Senators comprised equally of five Republicans and Democrats released the 2,702-page Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act, spending $1 trillion over eight years. The bipartisan bill represents weeks of negotiations among the Senators and with the White House concerning spending on roads, bridges, rail, ports and other projects across the U.S. While passage into law remains a way off with amendments in the Senate expected this week and progressives in the U.S. House raising reservations, the language revealed provides insight into some of what Congress may include in a final measure.

The bill provides broad authorizations to spend money but also focuses on narrow parts of industry including exploring large-scale demonstration projects such as industrial electric boilers. Other provisions in the Senate bipartisan bill that may not grab media headlines include establishing a rare-earth-elements demonstration facility; an advanced energy manufacturing and recycling grant program; study on job loss due to cancellation of the Keystone XL pipeline; creation of a Made in America Office; and promoting government contracting opportunities for U.S. manufacturers under the Buy American law. Senators place a significant emphasis on working with manufacturers to improve their energy efficiency and to develop new processes to reduce emissions and increase recycling. The bill also frequently references and provides support for small- and medium-sized manufacturers, which in parts of the legislation are defined as having fewer than 500 employees, gross annual sales under $100 million and those with annual energy bills totaling between $100,000 and $3,500,000.

The Senate aims to pass the measure by August 6, then pivoting to a broader Democrat-only $3.5 trillion budget resolution that will move in tandem with the bipartisan infrastructure bill. Final action is not expected until at least September.

On Sunday evening, August 1, a group of 10 Senators comprised equally of five Republicans and Democrats released the 2,702-page Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act, spending $1 trillion over eight years. The bipartisan bill represents weeks of negotiations among the Senators and with the White House concerning spending on roads, bridges, rail, ports and other projects across the U.S. While passage into law remains a way off with amendments in the Senate expected this week and progressives in the U.S. House raising reservations, the language revealed provides insight into some of what Congress may include in a final measure.

The bill provides broad authorizations to spend money but also focuses on narrow parts of industry including exploring large-scale demonstration projects such as industrial electric boilers. Other provisions in the Senate bipartisan bill that may not grab media headlines include establishing a rare-earth-elements demonstration facility; an advanced energy manufacturing and recycling grant program; study on job loss due to cancellation of the Keystone XL pipeline; creation of a Made in America Office; and promoting government contracting opportunities for U.S. manufacturers under the Buy American law. Senators place a significant emphasis on working with manufacturers to improve their energy efficiency and to develop new processes to reduce emissions and increase recycling. The bill also frequently references and provides support for small- and medium-sized manufacturers, which in parts of the legislation are defined as having fewer than 500 employees, gross annual sales under $100 million and those with annual energy bills totaling between $100,000 and $3,500,000.

The Senate aims to pass the measure by August 6, then pivoting to a broader Democrat-only $3.5 trillion budget resolution that will move in tandem with the bipartisan infrastructure bill. Final action is not expected until at least September.